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Neurophysiology, Neurobiology

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD and surrounding area

Position Description: 

Projects focus on the mechanisms underlying neuronal activity using GnRH neurons as the model system. In vivo, GnRH neurons, spread throughout the forebrain, release GnRH in a pulsatile fashion to control reproduction. In explants, primary GnRH neurons continue to release in a pulsatile fashion and show synchronized calcium oscillations. Projects utilize the GnRH system to study molecular and cellular properties of neuronal activity (individual cells and neuronal population dynamics) and correlate activity with secretion.
Recent work: 
  • Constantin S, Reynolds, D. Oh, A, Pizano K, Wray S. Nitric oxide resets kisspeptin-excited GnRH neurons via PIP2 replenishment. PNAS, 2021.
  • Dairaghi L, Constantin S, Oh A, Shostak D, Wray, S. The Dopamine D4 receptor regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron excitability in male mice. Accepted eNeuro, 2022.

NINDS, Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology Section (CDNS, https://dir.ninds.nih.gov/Faculty/Profile/susan-wray.html) within the Division of Intramural Research (https://dir.ninds.nih.gov/).

Qualifications:

Candidate must have an Ph.D., M.D. or D.O. degree or equivalent, and relevant training in Neurobiology, Neuroendocrinology, Molecular biology, or Developmental biology. The candidate must be less than 2 years out from obtaining their Ph.D. Candidates with experience in calcium imaging or electrophysiology, molecular biology and mouse anatomy preferred but not mandatory.

To Apply:

Email Dr. Susan Wray (wrays@ninds.nih.gov) an updated C.V. and cover letter.

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs and encourages the application and nomination of qualified women, minorities, and individuals with disabilitiesDHHS and NIH are Equal Opportunity Employers.