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2019 Summer Journal Clubs

Click on a journal club title to read the description. Register for a summer journal club.

BALTIMORE: Neuroimaging of Addiction

BALTIMORE: Special Topics in Aging

FREDERICK: Birth to Death of Protein: How Does Cellular Protein Homeostasis Reshape Cancer Biology

FREDERICK: DRUGS: Targeting Cancer

FREDERICK: The Role of Centrosomes in Cancer

TWINBROOK: Cannabis: Curse or Cure

Drugs Work, Until They Don’t: The Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

World War Z-Pak: Understanding the Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotics

Biology and Treatment of Cancer

Cancer Immunotherapy

Cancer Immunotherapy: Bench to Bedside

T Cells to the Rescue: Exploring Cancer Immunotherapy

CRISPR: From Yoghurt to Gene Editing

The CRISPR Revolution: From Basic Science to the Clinic

Can Genes Tell Us Who We Are? Social Implications of the Genome

Director's Cut: How Chemical Engineers and Biochemists Use the Tools of Evolution to Make New Proteins

Proteomics: The Final Frontier - Methods for the Analysis of Protein Structure and Function

"Omics" and Microbiology

Discovery: Neuropharmacological Treatments

Exploring Hot Topics in Cardiovascular and Hormone Health

From Bench to Bed

Stem Cell: Understanding Cellular Fate Determination in Curing Human Diseases

To Heal or Not to Heal: The Question of How Skin Develops and Repairs

Does an Apple a Day Really Keep the Doctor Away? The Science Behind Old Wives’ Tales

E-cigarettes: A Pathway for Tobacco Initiation or Cessation?

Honest Mistake? When Your Science Gets Away From You

How Addicted Can You Get? The Science Behind Substance Use Disorders

Social Relations & Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on How Others Get Under Our Skin

You Fight What You Eat

Foundational Techniques in Neuroscience: Multiscale Approach to Understanding the Brain

On the Baltimore Campus:

 

BALTIMORE: Neuroimaging of Addiction

We will be discussing addiction through the lens of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We will be discussing 6 seminal papers over the course of the 6 weeks that explore the field of addiction research, specifically using MRI. We will be discussing papers that interrogate the brain-based circuitry of addiction, brain-based responses to addiction-related cues as well as the use of neuromodulation as a treatment for addiction. Papers will span both human and animal MRI to better understand this brain-based disease.

Co-leaders: Robin J Keeley, postdoc, NIDA; Vaughn Steele, postdoc, NIDA
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Tuesday, July 23
Time: 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Location: BRC, Room: 7th floor conference room

BALTIMORE: Special Topics in Aging

As life expectancy continues to rise worldwide, it is increasingly important to understand aging trends and processes in order to maintain and improve quality of life at advanced age.   The Special Topics in Aging Journal Club will read and discuss journal articles focused on topics such as age-related cognitive decline, age-related neurodegenerative disease, and epidemiology of aging and longevity. Through the journal articles, participants will be introduced to techniques, approaches and models used in aging research.  Discussions will focus on identifying key findings in the literature as well as understanding the implications of these findings on the broader field of aging research. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to navigate scientific papers so that participants are able to understand methodology and interpret results reported in peer reviewed journal articles.  Assigned journal articles should be read in advance of each journal club and participants should be prepared to participate in a group discussion.

Co-leaders: Cristina Banuelos, postdoc, NIA; Laura Pomatto, postdoc, NIA
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 11; Thursday, July 18
Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: BRC, Room: 4C211

On the Frederick Campus

FREDERICK: Birth to Death of Protein: How Does Cellular Protein Homeostasis Reshape Cancer Biology

Proteostasis, or protein homeostasis, is essential to maintain cellular function, and the disturbance of proteostasis is associated with many diseases in the list of leading causes of death, including neurodegenerative diseases, aging, and cancer. Cancer cells can usurp cellular regulatory machineries that governs physiological proteostasis to circumvent selection pressure posed by either microenvironment or therapeutic interventions. This journal club will focus on the current biomedical approach in controlling protein quality and quantity in cancer biology and also discuss complex human conditions where protein homeostasis is disrupted. By completion of this journal club, attendees will have developed an understanding of common mechanisms of proteostasis in regulation of human diseases and learned how to read a scientific publication. 

Co-leaders: Kuo-Hui Su, research fellow, NCI; Dipak Poria, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Tuesday, June 25; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 17; Wednesday, July 24
Times: 1:00 - 2:30 pm
Location: Building 549, Room: Conference Room A; Building 560, Room: 11-61

FREDERICK: DRUGS: Targeting Cancer

Are you interested in learning how the study and management of cancer treatment is changing since the implementation of genomic sequencing? Next generation sequencing of patient tumor samples is becoming the main tool to stratify patients into clinical trials, such that only the molecular alteration-bearing patients will receive the corresponding targeted therapy. In this journal club, participants will learn about different approaches for identification of druggable cancer vulnerabilities as well as hurdles for the implementation of these therapeutics such as treatment resistance. Upon completion of the summer JC, students will have better understanding of current ways to pharmacological and genetic targeting of cancer. 

Co-leaders: Pedro Torres-Ayuso, postdoc, NCI; Elvira An, graduate student, NCI
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, June 26; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 17; Wednesday, July 24
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Location: Building 560, Room: 22-67A

FREDERICK: The Role of Centrosomes in Cancer

Centrosomes are small non-membranous organelles that function as the major microtubule organizing center in animal cells. But, how are centrosomes related to cancer? Centrosomes play an important role in organizing the mitotic spindle and cilia. During cell cycle centrosomes should duplicate just once to produce two centrosomes that will help to form the bipolar mitotic spindle. Cycling cells strictly regulate centrosome number to maintain the genomic integrity during the division process and abnormalities in the number of centrosomes can lead to tumorgenesis. The relation between centrosomes and cancer has been proposed for over a hundred years and it has remained controversial until the last years. In this journal club we will review and discuss the most important literature in the field, from the understanding of their biology (structure, organization and duplication cycle) to the latest publications proposing how centrosome aberrations contribute to carcinogenesis.

Co-leaders: Catherine Sullenberger, postdoc, NCI; Alejandra Vasquez Limeta, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, June 26; Wednesday, July 3; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 17; Wednesday, July 24
Time: 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Location: Building 549, Room: 549-B

On the Twinbrook Campus

TWINBROOK: Cannabis: Curse or Cure

The legalization of marijuana has been a topic of the debate recently.  The major components are natural cannabinoids, some of them have a significant negative effect on body and mind. Interestingly, many of those isolated compounds or synthetic cannabinoids in pure form have a beneficial effect as evident from experimental animal models. To understand the mechanistic effect, it is important to know their receptors cannabinoid 1 and 2. In addition to that, there is an important messenger molecule inside our body “endocannabinoid”. This journal club will cover both basic and applied part of the subject and latest drug development for therapeutic use.

Co-leaders: Partha Mukhpadhyay, staff scientist, NIAAA; Janos Paloczi, postdoc, NIAA
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Time: 10:00 - 11:00 am
Location: 5625 Fishers Lane, Room: Terrance Level Conference Room

On the Bethesda Campus

Drugs Work, Until They Don’t: The Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

Since the discovery and development of modern antibiotics began a century ago, many infectious diseases were hailed as treatable. However, much recent attention has turned to the evolution of bacterial species that are highly resistant to conventional drugs. These include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and ­­­­antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Infections that were once easily treated have proven to be difficult to control. This journal club will cover advances in our understanding of mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, how resistance genes are acquired and spread across species, and novel therapies – chemical and otherwise – that target alternate pathways. Members will learn about methods and approaches to studying antibiotic resistance, as well as applications to the way we use existing drugs and develop new ones.

Co-leaders: Carissa Chan, graduate student, NCI; Emily Peluso, graduate student, NCI; Sylvia Chareyre, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Monday, July 22
Times: 11:00 - 12:00 pm
Location: Building 37, Room: 5111

World War Z-Pak: Understanding the Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotics

Every year over 30 billion doses of antibiotics are administered worldwide. Each dose contains an active ingredient that is capable of specifically eliminating the bacterial infection while leaving the patient relatively unharmed. How is this single ingredient producing this amazing effect? In this journal club we will study the unique mechanism of actions employed by various antibiotics to kill bacteria and the ways bacteria are fighting back.

Co-leaders: James Marks, postdoc, NIAMS; Sezen Meydan, postdoc, NIDDK
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, Jun 26; Wednesday, July 3; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 17; Wednesday, July 24
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 pm
Location: Building 50, Room: 1327

Biology and Treatment of Cancer

This course will cover primary literature in the field of cancer biology. It is intended to be a course that is participants centered. The focus will be on gaining a better understanding of the current scientific literature in the etiology and treatment of cancer. We discuss articles in both a debate style and as a class presentation style. This course aims to give participants a basic understanding of the mechanisms that lead to cancer development and progression and the strategies used in the treatment of cancer.

Co-leaders: Khalid Garman, postdoc, NIAMS; Natasha Hill, postdoc, NIAMS
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, June 26; Tuesday, July 2; Wednesday, July 10
Time: 1:00 - 2:00 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 12S233

Cancer Immunotherapy

Malignant cancers are devastating illnesses, frequently with limited treatment options. However, researchers and physicians are working to find durable cures to reduce morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy is a promising area of treatment that harnesses a patient’s immune system to target and fight their tumors. Join us once a week to learn about the emerging field of cancer immunotherapy - from CAR-T cells to cancer vaccines. Each week, we will read a paper that focuses on a specific cancer immunotherapy and then meet to discuss the principals of the strategy and its implementation in the paper. Along the way, we will talk about how to read and critically evaluate scientific papers. The first hour will be a discussion of the science presented in the paper, followed by an optional hour where we can informally talk about the broader context of these research studies and scientific ethics. We look forward to seeing you! 

Co-leaders: Sarah Davies, graduate student, NHLBI; Elizabeth Potter, graduate student, NCI
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 11; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Time: 2:00 - 4:00 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 12S233
Directions: Enter building 10 through the south lobby, passing Masur Auditorium. Take the main elevators to the 12th floor. Follow the signs for the 12th floor conference room. It's just past the large TV/couch on the left.

Cancer Immunotherapy: Bench to Bedside

Cancer immunotherapy was designated as the breakthrough of the year in 2013, and since then advances in immunotherapeutic approaches have led to unprecedented responses in patients with cancer. This journal club will cover recent publications on cutting edge immunotherapies intended to treat tumors: adoptive cell therapies with genetically modified immune cells including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells, antibodies and immune checkpoint blockade. Members of this journal club will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the immune system and its potential in fighting cancer, in addition to being able to critically read and dissect scientific literature. 

Co-leaders: Stefan Barisic, postdoc, NHLBI; Emily Levy, graduate student, NHLBI
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, June 26; Wednesday, July 3; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 17
Time: 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 6E-3121

T Cells to the Rescue: Exploring Cancer Immunotherapy

Cancer Immunotherapy has received extensive media attention and is emerging as a promising treatment option to a wide variety of cancer types including late stage diseases. T cells are a major player behind this line of treatment and this journal club will explore the fundamental biology and applied methods in cancer immunotherapy. Specifically, we will discuss the principles of T cell immunotherapy which will include adoptive T cell transfer, checkpoint inhibition (anti-PD1) and gene engineered CAR T cells. Members will also be exposed to ongoing research for further improving therapeutic efficacy.  The objective of this journal club is to provide students with the tools to understand and critically evaluate both scientific and non-scientific medical literature.

Co-leaders: Devikala Gurusamy, research fellow, NCI; Amanda Henning, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Monday, June 17; Monday, June 24; Monday, July 1; Monday, July 8; Monday, July 15
Time: 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 4-5961
Directions: Take the central elevator (near the grand piano and Cafe) from Bldg.10/CRC atrium to 3rd floor. Walk down the West Corridor, follow the sign To 3 West Labs, swing to the left to enter 3 West Labs. Walk down the hall to the end of the hallway and turn right. You will find a series of elevator. Ride the elevator to the 4th floor.  The conference room will be right in front of the elevator Rm 4-5961

CRISPR: From Yoghurt to Gene Editing

This method-focused journal club is a slight modification of the highly successful CRISPR journal club we offered last year. It will highlight the development of CRISPR into its current state. We will also discuss the various potential applications of CRISPR and CRISPR-derived technologies. Potential topics include: gene editing, CRISPRi, CRISPRa, CRISPR-paint, Auxin-based degradation etc. Prior knowledge of molecular biology helpful but not necessary.

Co-leaders: Saroj Regmi, postdoc, NICHD; Shane Chen, postdoc, NICHD
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Location: Building 49, Room: 6th floor conference room

The CRISPR Revolution: From Basic Science to the Clinic

Recent advances in CRISPR-mediated genome modification spurred a revolution in molecular biology accompanied by a billion-dollar industry. CRISPR is being used in all facets of biology and biotechnology from basic research to therapeutics and beyond. This journal club will focus on CRISPR in genetic screens, clinical therapeutics and more. Throughout the course we will focus on primary research that led to these innovations and the ethical concerns of gene modification technologies in the near future.

Co-leaders: Matan Cohen, graduate student, NCI; Anura Gokul Shodhan, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Monday, June 17; Monday, June 24; Monday, July 8; Monday, July 22
Times: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Location: Building 37, Room: 6107
Directions: First building from the Old Georgetown and South Drive entrance. Take lift up to 6th floor, seminar room is right in front of the lift.

Can Genes Tell Us Who We Are?: Social Implications of the Genome

In this journal club, we will read articles that explore the social and ethical issues that arise with advances in genomics. These include: issues of diversity in genomic research, the historical and current use of race and ethnicity in genomics, health equity and access to genomic technologies, and the impact of genomics on people of color and other marginalized communities. This journal club is for interns interested in incorporating the pursuit of social equity in their scientific and medical careers.

Co-leaders: Kayla Cooper, research fellow, NHGRI; Julia Byeon, research fellow, NHGRI
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Tuesday, July 23.
Time: All sessions will be from noon to 1:00 pm EXCEPT the session on July 2, which will be from 2:00 - 3:00 pm; 
Location: Building 31, Room: B1E12/B1E14
Directions: Enter building 31 from the main entrance. Use the A-wing elevators located on your immediate right to level B1.Once you exit the elevators,  you will see the NIH Supply Center on you right, the room is located about 3 doors down past the NIH Supply Center

Director's Cut: How Chemical Engineers and Biochemists Use the Tools of Evolution to Make New Proteins

This journal club will explore the Nobel Prize winning work of Drs. Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith, and Gregory P. Winter on DIRECTED EVOLUTION, a method to design proteins with new functions 

SESSION 1 - What does Google say? DIRECTED EVOLUTION burst into mainstream media after the announcement of the 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry. In this session, we will examine press coverage surrounding this event. How does the press portray (or not) the scientific process? What is their interpretation of DIRECTED EVOLUTION? How does the press predict this technique will change our lives?

SESSION 2 - What do the textbooks say? Here we will step back and review basic concepts such as the process of protein production, genetic mutation, natural selection, antibody function, etc. The purpose will be to cover the background knowledge needed to tackle the primary literature.

SESSION 3 - What does history say? Why have previous attempts to "design" new proteins failed so spectacularly? Through the lens of hindsight, we will learn about early strategies used to shape protein function. We will also look at previous press coverage of those strategies. How did their excitement level compare to the excitement of the press now?

SESSION 4 - What do the Nobel laureates say? We will discuss primary research articles on Dr. Arnold's work using "unnatural selection" to create enzymes with new functions. 

SESSION 5 - What else do the Nobel laureates say? We will discuss primary research articles on Drs. George P. Smith, and Gregory P. Winter work using phage display to create new antibodies for immunotherapy. 

SESSION 6 - What do YOU say? In this last session, we will reflect on how accurately the general press represented concept of DIRECTED EVOLUTION. Were their descriptions oversimplified or spot on? Did the press over-promise on what this technique can deliver? If you were a reporter, would you do things differently? Finally, we will examine attempts by ThermoFisher and other companies to commercialize DIRECTED EVOLUTION. If you were the PI of a lab, would you buy into that product?

Co-leaders: Christine Krieger, staff scientist, NIDDK; Alisa Boutin, staff scientist, NIDDK
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 4; Thursday, July 11; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25th
Time: 12:20 pm - 1:30 pm
Location: Building 50, Room: 4328 

Proteomics: The Final Frontier - Methods for the Analysis of Protein Structure and Function

The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray analysis have given scientists a wide view of the changing genome and transcriptome, propelling personalized medicine and systems biology into a new age. The final frontier, however, lies in the changing proteome – a vast, complicated network of protein effectors which respond to the world outside of the cell and coordinate cellular processes. Study of the highly dynamic and complex proteome demands sophisticated techniques, such as mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, x-ray crystallography and confocal microscopy. In this journal club, we will introduce these methods within the context of their application to the study of Toll-like Receptor signaling, a critical component of the immune response highlighted by the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Co-leaders: Casey Marie Daniels, postdoc, NIAID; Joseph Gillen, postdoc, NIAID
Dates: Wednesday, June 19th; Wednesday, June 26th; Wednesday, July 3rd; Wednesday, July 10th; Wednesday, July 17th; Wednesday, July 24th
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 pm
Location: Building 4, Room: 118
Directions: Enter from the parking lot side of the building, first room on your left.

"Omics" and Microbiology

We will explore cutting-edge research that takes advantage of the ever-growing next-generation sequencing (NGS) toolbox. NGS has revolutionized the way we understand microbes and we will discuss papers relating to both clinical and evolutionary microbiology. This will be good for students interested in topics such as host-pathogen interactions, bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance, and bacterial responses to the environment. The goal is to introduce students to basic NGS research as it relates to microbes. No previous experience with NGS is needed.

Co-leaders: Britney Lee Phippen, postdoc, CC; Nicole Lloyd, postdoc, CC
Dates: Tuesday, June 18th; Tuesday, July 2nd; Tuesday, July 9th; Tuesday, July 16th; Tuesday, July 23rd
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm
Building, Room: Building 10, Room: 2C-314
Directions: 2nd floor Building 10, near 2nd floor cafeteria. Go through main Department of Laboratory Medicine door, room will be before next door on the right. 

Discovery: Neuropharmacological Treatments

How do scientists translate lab observations into therapies?  Neurological diseases are a huge public health burden, yet current treatments are not effective for all patients, or a treatment does not exist at all.  This neuroscience drug discovery journal club will give you a better understanding of how the drug discovery and development process is conducted.  Selected papers will cover the principles of finding drug targets, novel compound identification, validation of those compounds, preclinical animal testing, and repurposing of existing compounds for new treatments for stroke, cancer, and beyond.

Co-leaders: Amy Moritz, postdoc, NINDS; Kathryn Luderman, postdoc, NINDS
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Tuesday, July 23
Time: 10:00 - 11:00 am. except the second session, which will be from 11:00 am - noon
Location: Building 35: Room 1G600 (Orange Skybox: sessions 1,3, 5, and 6); Room 3G600 (Blue Skybox: session 2); and Room GG 607 (ground floor: session 4)

Exploring Hot Topics in Cardiovascular and Hormone Health

With rapid progresses being made in the field of disease prevention and treatment, scientists and budding scientists come across many journal articles detailing research studies. Hence, understanding research design, the strengths and limitations of a study design, and the interpretation of study results is an important skill to learn and practice. This journal club will use examples from hormone health to understand published literature and draw appropriate conclusions by seeking answers to relevant questions about the published study.  The articles discussed in this course will focus on hormones and their relationship with health and the heart.  We will also introduce the audience to Pubmed, a biomedical literature database, and how to conduct basic searches to find reliable scientific information.

Co-leaders: Smita Jha, staff clinician, CC; Marissa Lightbourne, staff clinician, NICHD
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Wednesday, July 3; Thursday, July 11; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Time: 2:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 1-1730 NW

From Bench to Bed

'From Bench to Bed Journal Club' will present and discuss papers representing basic and translational research. Scope of papers' topic will remain wide open. Participants will be encouraged to propose a paper of his/her interest including own paper to present. We will discuss the presented paper in light of hypothesis, findings, strength and weakness, and future directions suggested by the authors.  There will be four sessions. The format of the club has been designed to be helpful to students who are exploring scientific investigations.  

Co-leaders: Rafique M Islam, postdoc, NIDDK; Francine Baker, graduate student, NCI
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Times: 3:00 - 4:30 pm, except the final session, which will be 11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Location: Building 50, Room: 1328/1334 (sessions 1 and 3); Building 50, Room: 1227/1233 (sessions 2 and 4)

Stem Cells: Understanding Cellular Fate Determination in Curing Human Diseases

Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many types of somatic cells. In the past decades, the understanding of how stem cells commit to a specific cell type has opened many potential medical uses of stem cells. This journal club will cover recent researches in two specific topics of stem cell biology: 1) Uncovering the cause of a developmental disease. 2) Immunotherapy to cure cancer. Members will learn how does a researcher use stem cells in finding the cause of diseases and the possible therapeutic application to cure the diseases. They will also learn how to critically read a scientific publication. 

Co-leaders: Md Abul Basar, postdoc, NIDCR; SM Rafiqul Islam, postdoc, NCI
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16
Time: 4:00 - 5: 30 pm
Location: Building 30, Room: 318 (first two sessions); Building 10, Room: 4-5961 (last two sessions)

To Heal or Not to Heal: The Question of How Skin Develops and Repairs         

The skin is an incredibly resilient and indispensable barrier that keeps the bad out, the good in, and has fundamentally shaped how we interact with the environment (and organisms) surrounding us. An orchestrated cellular cascade is vital to the development, maintenance, and repair of skin with quite overt results when this symphony is disrupted. From 'in utero' to 'in the clinic,' this journal club will explore the dynamic that underpins the embryonic origins of the skin, its ability to maintain and repair itself over a lifetime of use, and how current translational and basic research efforts are searching to heal debilitating defects. Members will read, present, and discuss chosen manuscripts that employ cutting-edge techniques in the field of dermatologic research. Snacks will be provided!

Co-leaders: Daniela Grassini, postdoc, NIAMS; Andrew Overmiller, postdoc, NIAMS
Dates: Monday, June 17; Monday, June 24; Monday, July 1; Monday, July 8; Monday, July 15; Monday, July 22
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm
Location: Building 50, Room: 1327
Directions: Enter front door of Building 50, proceed to the hallway next to the bathrooms, turn right. First door to the left.

Does an Apple a Day Really Keep the Doctor Away? The Science Behind Old Wives’ Tales

Worried that shaving hair will make it grow back faster and thicker? Have you ever been scolded for cracking your knuckles and told that it “causes arthritis”? Many of us have grown up hearing these old wives’ tales. In this journal club we will take a look at a few papers that either debunk or confirm common old wives’ tales. Join us while we attempt to understand if grandmothers around the world were right all along. 

Co-leaders: Reafa Hossain, research fellow, NIAID; Samuel Smith, research fellow, NIAID
Dates: Wednesday, June 19; Wednesday, June 26; Wednesday, July 3; Wednesday, July 10; Wednesday, July 24
Time: 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Location: Building 50, Room: 6334
Directions: Take elevator from the main lobby to the 6th floor. Turn right after exiting elevators and begin to walk towards bathrooms/water fountains. At the first intersection, turn right then continue to walk straight. The room will be on the right across from the cargo elevator.

E-cigarettes: A Pathway for Tobacco Initiation or Cessation?

Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) that deliver a nicotine-containing vapor, has increased rapidly across the country and globally. E-cigarettes are often perceived and marketed as a “healthier alternative” to conventional cigarettes and a tool for smoking cessation for adult smokers. However, in recent years, e-cigarettes (especially JUUL products) are increasingly used by teenagers and young adults who are naïve to tobacco products. E-cigarette use among this group may negatively impact lung function as well as lead to nicotine addiction and initiation of conventional cigarette smoking. Debate continues over e-cigarette manufacturing and marketing as legislators and scientists weigh the pros and cons of e-cigarette use among various population groups. This journal club will cover recent cutting-edge publications on the harms and benefits of using e-cigarette products focusing on the U.S. youth and adult populations. The members of this journal club will learn about the potential harms and benefits of using e-cigarettes as well as how to critically evaluate scientific publications and assess controversial health topics. 

Co-leaders: Julia Cen Chen-Sankey, postdoc, NIMHD; Kristyn Kamke, postdoc, NIMHD
Dates: Thursday, June 20; Thursday, June 27; Thursday, July 11; Thursday, July 18; Thursday, July 25
Times: 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm, (2:00 end time for sessions 3 and 4)
Location: Building 3, Room: BW07
Directions: Arrive at the basement level of Building 3 and walk through the hallway until you see the conference room (across the bathrooms).

Honest Mistake? When Your Science Gets Away From You

Lately, it seems as though the entire scientific enterprise is in a state of crisis.  Specifically, a replication crisis.  There are a number of reasons that may prevent the findings of one group from being reproduced in another laboratory, including outright fraud but also, and of equal concern, errors born of the scientific process itself.  This journal club will explore work that has been retracted, focusing specifically on two stories.  In the first, we consider the controversial existence of cardiac stem cells.  In the second, we learn about the putative connection between the XMR virus and chronic fatigue syndrome.  Through these seriously deep dives into studies that shook and shaped their fields, we will watch scientists dig themselves into deep holes, see how the field corrects itself, and be reminded to question everything!

Co-leaders: Aparna Kishor, research fellow, NHLBI; Christina Ross, research fellow, NCI
Dates: Friday, June 21; Friday, June 28; Friday, July 5; Friday, July 12; Friday, July 19; Friday, July 26
Time: 2:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Building 50, Room 3328
Directions: Take the Bldg 50 lobby elevators to the 2nd floor.  When you come out of the elevators, make a hard right around the corner and the room will be on your right.

How Addicted Can You Get? The Science Behind Substance Use Disorders

For our Journal Club we have planned four lessons regarding: (i) The Neurobiology of Substance Use Disorders; (ii) Opioids and the Opioid Crisis; (iii) Alcohol and the Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk; (iv) Cannabis, its Medical Use and Controversies. We will review brain research on the neurobiological processes that turn casual substance use into a compulsive disorder. The latter results from changes in the brain circuits such as the brain circuits involved in pleasure (the reward system), learning, stress, decision making, and self-control that can occur with repeated use of alcohol or drugs. We will then focus on the effects of opioids and the opioid crisis, also known as the opioid epidemic, i.e., the rapid increase in the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in the United States, beginning in the late 1990s.

We will also address the controversial topic of the effects of alcohol addiction on the cardiovascular system. Conventional epidemiological studies have associated alcohol intake with reduced cardiovascular risk in many studies, in comparison with abstinence or with heavier drinking. However, these apparently protective effects may be largely non-causal and more recent research suggests that alcohol consumption uniformly increases blood pressure and stroke risk.

Finally, we will describe the use of cannabis as a treatment for conditions such as pain, epilepsy, and gastrointestinal disorders. At the same time, we will tackle the increasing concerns that accompany the legalization of cannabis, such as the potential to trigger and exacerbate mental health problems or the risk to the fetuses/newborns when the drug is used by pregnant or lactating women.

With this Journal Club we aim to: (i) engage students, by gaining a good understanding of their skills, interests, beliefs, limitations and encourage active learning instead of passive listening to lectures; (ii) assess performance, by adapting it to the subject taught, and, at the same time, encourage self-assessment by providing notions about metacognition, which gives students the opportunity to practice an active monitoring of thinking; (iii) assign carefully designed homework and provide feedback, when possible on an individual basis or through peer collaboration, e.g., small group discussions, 1-minute essays, think-pair-share; (iv) pay attention to the affective aspects of teaching and create a positive state of mind.

At the end of the Journal Club the students will answer a multiple-choice quiz, regarding the knowledge acquired throughout the four lessons. The quiz will not be graded, but it will serve for the purpose of increasing confidence in this knowledge.

Co-leaders: Daria Piacentino, postdoc, NIAAA; Mehdi Farokhnia, research fellow, NIAAA
Dates: Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Tuesday, July 23
Time: 2:00 - 3:00 pm
Location: Building 10, Room: 1-3461 (Conference Room)
Directions: Go to the North Lobby of Building 10, walk past Starbucks and make a left turn. You will see a door with written on it 1 SE Inpatient Unit. Ring the bell and enter to reach the classroom.

Social Relations & Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on How Others Get Under Our Skin

Social relations, including close, personal networks, relationship quality, and social integration, have long been linked to physical and mental health, psychological well-being, and even mortality. This journal club will review both classic and recent findings that shed light on how our relationships with others can get under our skin to help and hurt us through behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological mechanisms. Integrating perspectives from psychology, sociology, biology, and public health, we will discuss ways that social relations might be leveraged to benefit individuals, families, and societies. In addition to topical knowledge, this journal club will provide students with the opportunity to think critically about scientific articles, learn about methods used to address questions in the social sciences, and engage in active discussions about science.

Co-leaders: Jasmine Manalel, postdoc, NHGRI; Calandra Whitted, graduate student, NHGRI
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16
Time: 4:00 - 5:00 pm
Location: Building 31, Room: 4B31
Directions: From the entrance of 31A, walk down the hallway slightly to the right of the front doors, past the gift shop and cafeteria. At the end of the hall, turn right and take the stairs/elevator to the 4th floor. After exiting the stairs/elevator, turn right and the conference room will be on the left. 

You Fight What You Eat

Food is not just food, it is a combination of micro- and macronutrients which helps us to maintain an adequate balance in our body but can also be associated with the development of some diseases. The immune system is a combination cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body against foreign agents such as microorganisms. During this journal club we will discuss how diet can affect our immune system and can improve our health or even lead to disease. We will introduce some topics of basic immunology and diseases that are linked to the immune system. It has been proven that eating too much sugar or fat is detrimental to the body, but we will show the exact consequences it has on the cells and tissues of the immune system.

Co-leaders: Liliana Patino-Molano, postdoc, NIDCR; Thierry Gauthier, postdoc, NIDCR
Dates: Monday, June 17; Monday, June 24; Monday, July 1; Monday, July 8; Monday, July 15
Time: 10:00 - 11:00 am
Location: Building 30, Room: 318

Foundational Techniques in Neuroscience: Multiscale Approach to Understanding the Brain

We will study four to five classic neuroscience techniques that every young scientist (neuroscientist or not!) should learn about. For each method, we’ll read a paper that established an important result via that method. The methods will span across scales of investigation, from molecular to systems. By the end of the summer, participants will understand the biological logic of these techniques, and will be able to interpret similar data.

Proposed schedule:

Week 1: (Systems and cognition; psychophysics) e.g. Buffalo et al, 1999, Learning and Mem 

Week 2: (Circuits; optogenetics and cell-type specificity) e.g. Li et al, 2018, Nat Neurosci

Week 3: (Development; genetics)

Week 4: (Cellular; electrophysiology) e.g. Hubel and Wiesel

Week 5: (Molecular; MD simulations)

Co-leaders: Jonah Pearl, graduate student, NIMH; Suhwan Paul Lee, graduate student, NINDS; Maia Pujara, postdoc, NIMH
Dates: Tuesday, June 18; Tuesday, June 25; Tuesday, July 2; Tuesday, July 9; Tuesday, July 16; Tuesday, July 23
Time: 3:30 - 4:30 pm
Location: Building 35, Room: 2G 600
Directions: The yellow skybox in building 35 located on the second floor. It is extremely noticeable as it is located in the center of the building with distinct colors for each floor.

 Register for a Summer Journal Club!