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2018 Summer Journal Clubs

Click on a journal club title to read the description. Register for a Summer Journal Club! 

The natural selection of p53: Can evolution explain why p53 is commonly involved in cancer?
Despicable MEtastasis and cancer stem cells: Therapy's greatest resistance
May the Force be with cells migrating in the body!
Cancer as a genetic disease: The view from RNA
Techniques in structural biology
Immune defenders: How the immune system protects us from disease
Proteomics: The final frontier - Methods for the analysis of protein structure and function
The CRISPR revolution: A double stranded break-through
To be or not to be (in the loop): new paradigms in epigenetics, chromatin architecture, and transcription regulation to better understand disease
GNARLI- generations of neuroscience: A retrospective look at mental Illnesses
The DNA damage response and human disease
Single particle cryo-EM: Seeing macro-molecules in atomic details
Beyond the original 20: Expanding the genetic code for making designer proteins
Your brain on meditation: The neuroscience of mind-body practices
Stressed? A scientific exploration of stress effects on the brain, immune system, and metabolism
Next generation sequencing: Paving the way towards personalized medicine
FREDERICK: Cancer immunotherapy
The mighty mitochondria
Exploring health behaviors: Cardiovascular risk biomarkers and predictors in sleep, physical and dietary behaviors
FREDERICK: Systems oncology: A cell signaling perspective to target cancer
Molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration
Biology and the story of a million computers: A brief journey through the history of bioinformatics
Cancer Immunotherapy
The social network: Brain circuitry underlying social behaviors
From genetic screens to CRISPR: A survey of powerful methods to dissect biological function
Developing novel strategies for the treatment of human cancer
Cancer Immunotherapy: Bench to bedside
Packing it up: How cells pack tangled DNA into neat chromosomes
Traffic jams in neurons: Current trends in mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases
FREDERICK : Genetics of New Drug Development
Aging and cancer biology
Diseases, cancer, and aging of the skin: Exploring the role of immunity in skin processes
Advanced imaging techniques in biomedical sciences
The complex dance of chromosomes: How do cells condense their chromatin one hundred times to complete cell division?
A brief introduction to dopamine signaling in addiction and social behavior

Journal Club Descriptions

The natural selection of p53: Can evolution explain why p53 is commonly involved in cancer?
Description: The p53 gene is mutated in approximately 50% of human cancers. This common axiom is routinely disseminated throughout the cancer research community but the reasons underlying why p53 is so frequently mutated are less sharply in focus. In its wildtype form, p53 occupies a central position in stress response networks and thereby limits oncogenesis through activities that govern adaptive responses. When cells are challenged by genotoxic agents, radiation, hypoxia or other inappropriate signals, p53 restrains cell growth through activities that arrest the cell cycle and/or promote senescence, DNA repair or apoptosis. Why are p53 mutations so regularly found in tumors? Are there special properties that impart peculiar activity to the gene and/or its protein product? Or is p53 simply an ordinary protein that happens to occupy a rate-limiting ‘hub position' in the larger scale of regulatory networks?

Co-leaders: Alisa Boutin, staff scientist, NIDDK; Christine Krieger, staff scientist, NIDDK;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: 2.30 pm; Building 50, Room 4328

Despicable MEtastasis and cancer stem cells: Therapy's greatest resistance
Description: Cancer stem cells (CSC) and metastasis (cancer cells spreading to secondary organs) lead to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Despite research advances, they remain an important challenge for improving patient outcome and survival. This journal club will review recent publications uncovering multiple facets of CSCs and metastasis. Members will learn methods and protocols for studying CSCs and metastasis and gain critical thinking skills by discussing and sharing their thoughts on scientific publications.

Co-leaders: Amelie Vezina, postdoc, NCI; Alex Wu, postdoc, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: 4:00 PM; Building 37, Room vestibule 2nd floor

May the force be with cells migrating in the body!
Description: Cell migration is an important process for organism development and numerous physiological functions. From the bright side of shaping tissues, wound healing and immune response to the dark side of cancer metastasis, cells employ mechanical forces to move around the body alone or in groups. In this journal club, we will discuss the recent advancements in the field of cell migration, characterizing the mechanisms and roles of single cell and collective migration during physiological and pathological processes.

Co-leaders: Ankita Jha, postdoc, NHLBI; Valentin Jaumouille, postdoc, NHLBI;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Monday, June18th, Monday, June 25th, Monday, July 2nd, Monday, July 9th, Monday, July 16th; Time: 3:30; Building 50, Room 2328 (Library)

Cancer as a genetic disease: The view from RNA
Description: Malignant transformation arises from genetic changes, but we now know that post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms-the processes controlling how much RNA function and quantity-also contribute to the cancer phenotype. In this journal club, we will examine the importance of RNA (everything from mRNA to lncRNA) in the regulation of gene expression. The RNA stability, translational efficiency, and metastatic potential of a transformed cell will be just a few of the topics of interest. This is a challenging area of biology, with implications for health and disease continually emerging. We are excited to dive into it with you.

Co-leaders: Aparna Kishor, postdoc, NHLBI; Christina Ross, postdoc, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday July 26; Time: 1 pm; Building 50, Room 2328
Directions: Elevators/stairs to 2nd floor, take a right when you are in front of the bathrooms and it will be the first door on your right.

Techniques in structural biology
Description: In this journal club, we will learn about various structural biology techniques by focusing on the nucleosome structure. The nucleosome is the basic structural unit of DNA, where a piece of DNA is wrapped around a core of four histone proteins. This create the "beads on a string" structure which is the first step in chromatin organization. We will follow the history of nucleosome structure by looking at the multiple structural techniques that have shed light on nucleosome organization and dynamics.

Co-leaders: Ashley Pitt, graduate student, NIDDK; Porsha Shaw, postdoc, NIDDK;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Wednesday, June 20, Wednesday, June 27, Wednesday, July 11, Wednesday, July 18, Wednesday, July 25; Time: 2pm; Building 50, Room 4328
Directions: Take two rights out of elevator, first door on the the right.

Immune defenders: How the immune system protects us from disease
Description: This journal club is designed to introduce students to the many ways the immune system fights against pathogens. We will start with an introduction of the immune system's two lines of defense, innate and adaptive immunity, and will further focus each week on how the body responds to a variety of bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. Finally, we will discuss applications of manipulating the immune response to stimulate protective immunity through vaccinations.

Co-leaders: Carly Starke, graduate student, NIAID; Keyla Tumas, graduate student, NIAID;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 19, Tuesday, June 26, Tuesday, July 3, Tuesday, July 10, Tuesday, July 17, Tuesday, July 24; Time: 12-1pm; Building 4, Room 433

Proteomics: The final frontier - Methods for the analysis of protein structure and function
Description: The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray analysis have given scientists a wide view of the changing genome and transcriptome, propelling personalized medicine and systems biology into a new age. The final frontier, however, lies in the changing proteome - a vast, complicated network of protein effectors which respond to the world outside of the cell and coordinate cellular processes. Study of the highly dynamic and complex proteome demands sophisticated techniques, such as mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, x-ray crystallography and confocal microscopy. In this journal club, we will introduce these methods within the context of their application to the study of Toll-like Receptor signaling, a critical component of the immune response highlighted by the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Co-leaders: Casey Daniels, postdoc, NIAID; Joseph Gillen, postdoc, NIAID;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: noon; Building 4, Room 118
Directions: From the main entrance, first room on your left.

The CRISPR revolution: A double stranded break-through
Description: CRISPR has exploded onto the scene of biomedical research, allowing for the easy manipulation of genomes in both basic research as well as the clinic. Uses include the streamlined creation of gene knockout cells and animals, "fixing" genetic diseases, identifying novel biological pathways, visualizing DNA regions, and many more. Our journal club will focus on some of the key findings that launched the CRISPR revolution, creative applications of the technology that have advanced numerous fields, as well as ethical issues and ongoing human clinical trials. Come find out why CRISPR/Cas9 will be awarded the Nobel Prize and why it may be one of the most useful new technologies for young scientists.

Co-leaders: Devin Dersh, postdoc, NIAID; Biman Paria, staff scientist, NCI; Priyankaa Bhatia, research fellow, NIAID
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 19, Tuesday, June 26, Tuesday, July 10, Tuesday, July 17, Tuesday, July 24; Time: 4:30-5:30 pm; Building Building 4, Room 118

To be or not to be (in the loop): New paradigms in epigenetics, chromatin architecture, and transcription regulation to better understand disease
Description: Traditionally, mutations in coding genes and cis regulatory elements have been described as the driving force to explain phenotypes. However, it is becoming clear that epigenetics and chromatin 3D configuration are also implicated in disease. In this course, students will discuss the most recent literature that have shed light on the molecular mechanism involved in transcription regulation, chromatin topology and their relationships with disease. In this regard, students will also learn the concepts behind cutting-edge techniques related with chromatin organization and synthetic biology. Overall, the aim of this course is to enlighten students about how epigenetics and 3D chromatin organization exert major roles in transcriptional regulation and their impacts on disease.

Co-leaders: Ezequiel Nazer, postdoc, NIDDK; Benjamin Leadem, postdoc, NIDDK;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12; Time: 4-5pm; Building 50, Room 3328

GNARLI- Generations of neuroscience: A retrospective look at mental Illnesses
Description: Historically, the criteria to define psychological disturbance, substance misuse, abuse, or addiction, and other maladaptive behaviors have been everchanging. Which behaviors are classified as pathological? How do we frame solutions? What populations have been affected the most? These and many more questions will be tackled in this journal club, specifically in the context of 19th-21st century basic research, psychology and psychiatry. Through literature review and audiovisual resources, students of all levels will be encouraged to apply their critical thinking skills while discussing historical and recent research publications, with an emphasis on the questions and methods of behavioral science.

Co-leaders: Fany Messanvi, postdoc, NIMH; Gabriela Zabala-Aleman, graduate student, NIMH; Madeleine Perkins, research fellow,
Dates/Times/Location: Wednesday, June 20, Wednesday, June 27, Wednesday, July, 4, Wednesday, July 11, Wednesday, July 18, Wednesday, July 25; Time: 12:00pm; Building 35, Room 2E452
Directions: Enter Building 35 through the entrance across the street from Building 49, take the main elevators to the 2nd floor. Make 2 rights, and enter through the double doors facing you. walk to the end of the corridor. Enter through the door, make a right, pass the door to pod E, the room will be to your right.

The DNA damage response and human disease
Description: Damage to the DNA can compromise genomic stability and result in human disease. The DNA damage response pathways have evolved to protect against insults to the DNA and help maintain genomic integrity. In this journal club, we will focus on DNA repair mechanisms and their role in human diseases. This journal club will be directed towards students that have only minimal knowledge and experience in the field as well as in reading scientific papers. We will introduce the basics of the DNA damage response to our students. Our journal club will focus on learning how to approach a scientific question and critically read scientific papers while getting aquainted with several molecular and cellular biology techniques.

Co-leaders: Inbal Gazy, postdoc, NIDDK; Xianon Zhao, research fellow, NIDDK; Daman Kumari, staff scientist, NIDDK
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 26, Tuesday, July 3, Tuesday, July 10, Tuesday, July 17, Tuesday, July 24; Time: 1:30-2:30 PM; Building 12a, Room 1017

Single particle cryo-EM: Seeing macro-molecules in atomic details
Description: Cryo-EM is a biophysical technique used to study the structure of proteins and biomolecular complexes. Due to recent technical improvements, high level of molecular details can now be observed. Last year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 was awarded to pioneers of this technique. This highlights how cryo-EM has become a method of choice to resolve many challenging questions in structural biology such as the study of membrane proteins, heterogeneous samples, large assemblies like viruses, or smaller macromolecules. In this journal club, students will critically analyze recent scientific articles covering specific applications. Join us and discover the opportunities that this technique provides to gain new insights in how biological life functions.

Co-leaders: Jean-Philippe Demers, postdoc, NCI; Sagar Chittori, postdoc, NCI; Jana Ognjenovic, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 14, Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19; Time: 1:30pm; Building Building 50, Room 4306
Directions: Directly in front of the elevator, 4th floor.

Beyond the original 20: Expanding the genetic code for making designer proteins
Description: The ability to alter the properties of proteins of interest, whether for investigative or therapeutic purposes, has been a long standing goal of modern health research. The age of molecular biology has allowed us to modify and create designer peptides based around the core 20 proteinogenic amino acids, however going beyond this restrictive set has thus far been a challenge. Until now, that is. Enter genetic code expansion, the name given to a variety of techniques aimed at the site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into any protein of interest. The scope is vast - from adding fluorophores for protein visualisation and localisation to UV-crosslinkable groups for studying protein-protein interaction, or other bioorthognal reactive groups to allow even greater felxibility in functionality. Students attending this journal club series will learn about the methods used to expand the genetic code, including amber codon suppression, codon reassignment, quadruplet codon generation, and genetic alphabet expansion, as well as examples of the successful application of these techniques in solving complex biological problems. Reading, understanding, and critically evaluating scientific papers will also be covered.

Co-leaders: Katharina Kolbe, postdoc, NIAID; Gareth Prosser, postdoc, NIAID;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 19, Tuesday, June 26, Monday, July 9, Monday, July 23; Time: 4-5 pm; Building 31, Room 8

Your brain on meditation: The neuroscience of mind-body practices
Description: Description: We will read and discuss primary research articles utilizing neuroscience (especially cognitive and affective neuroscience) to study mind-body practices such as yoga, mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, and more. Some attention will be paid to clinical efficacy; more will be paid to mechanisms of these practices. Both human and animal research will be included.

Co-leaders: Laura Case, postdoc, NCCIH; Mark Pitcher, postdoc, NCCIH;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Friday June 22, Friday June 29, Friday July 6, Friday July 13, Friday July 20; Time: noon; Building Porter Neuroscience Building 35A, Room 1E452

Stressed? A scientific exploration of stress effects on the brain, immune system, and metabolism
Description: Stress gets a bad rap for having all sorts of negative effects on health, and it can contribute to numerous disease processes. On the other hand, many elements of the stress response are required for normal healthy functioning. In this journal club we'll discuss recent studies examining how stressors can affect diverse aspects of physiology. We'll aim to cover research on the nervous system, immunity, metabolism, and the microbiota, with basic and clinical research. We are curious to explore major findings and understand their impact in everyday life.

Co-leaders: Matthew Taves, postdoc, NCI; Alana O'Mara, research fellow, NIDDK; Gabriela Riscuta, clinical fellow, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thurs, June 21, Thurs, June 28, Thurs, July 5, Thurs, July 12, Thurs, July 19, Thurs, July 26; Time: 12 pm - 1 pm; Building 37, Room 4041
Directions: Come to the North Entrance facing South Drive, take the elevator or stairs up, and go left. Turn right into the next hallway and the room is immediately on your right.

Next Generation sequencing: Paving the way towards personalized medicine
Description: In the last decade, next-generation sequencing (NGS) have enabled us to obtain extensive information about genomes and its changes in governing cellular fate. In this journal club, we will discuss how various NGS technologies are improving our understanding of biology and their applications in uncovering cellular mechanisms that are altered in human diseases. Our aim is to familiarize participants with the basic concepts of genomic studies, along with how to read and critically interpret primary scientific literature. Light refreshments will be provided!

Co-leaders: Neelam Dabas Sen, research fellow, NICHD; Suna Gulay French, postdoc, NICHD;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Wednesday, June 20, Wednesday, June 27, Wednesday, July 11, Wednesday, July 18; Time: 4-5pm; Building 6, Room 220-Meeting Room
Directions: Second floor, next to break room.

FREDERICK: Cancer immunotherapy
Description: Do you want to learn more about the trends in cancer immunotherapy? In this journal club, we will cover the most promising applications of immunotherapy that are currently in clinical trials. We will first cover review articles about adoptive cell therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and other antibody-based immunotherapies. Finally, we'll study a research paper from a high-impact journal about the topics we have covered for you to learn the basics of how to read a scientific paper and discuss about it.

Co-leaders: Neslihan Kayraklioglu, postdoc, NCI; Begum Horuluoglu, graduate student, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Frederick, MD; June 20, June 27, July 11, July 18, July 25; Time: 12:30-1:30; Building 567, Room 161
Directions: Use the B entrance of Bldg 567, room is on the first floor near the water fountain.

The mighty mitochondria
Description: You've probably heard that mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. But, mitochondria are so much more than that! This journal club will also discuss how they're important for proper localization of membrane components, life or death cellular decisions, and that their dysfunction can lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's. All meetings will be the same time/day/place and brain food will be provided!

Co-leaders: Nicholas Ader, graduate student, NINDS; Hetal Shah, graduate student, NINDS;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Monday, June 18, Monday, June 25, Monday, July 2, Monday, July 9, Monday, July 23; Time: 4:00 PM; Building 35, Room 2G600 (Yellow Skybox)

Exploring health behaviors: Cardiovascular risk biomarkers and predictors in sleep, physical and dietary behaviors
Description: Improving health behaviors is an important factor in lowering risk for cardiovascular disease. Exploring predictors of behavior and biomarkers that assess risk can often help determine target populations for health behavior interventions. This journal club will cover recent publications on a variety of cardiovascular risk biomarkers and predictors for health behaviors. Member will learn about methods and interventions, as well as critically evaluate scientific publications.

Co-leaders: Nicole Farmer, postdoc, CC; Jumin Park, postdoc, CC;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, June 28, July 12, July 19; Time: 1-2 pm; Building 10, Room 2b11
Directions: The 2b corridor is located off of the floor cafeteria. Please look for doorway with the Nursing Research overhead sign. The library is within the center of the main hallway.

FREDERICK: Systems oncology: A cell signaling perspective to target cancer
Description: This journal club will provide an overview on cancer biology, therapeutic resistance and crosstalk between tumor cells and their microenvironment from a cell signaling perspective. Techniques that will be discussed include from traditional protein analysis or molecular biology, to the use of CRISPR, genetic screenings, next generation sequencing and cancer models (patient-derived xenografts and organoids).

Co-leaders: Pedro Torres-Ayuso, postdoc, NCI; Elvira An, graduate student, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Frederick, MD; Wednesdays, June 20, June 27, July 11, July 18; Time: 12-2 pm; June 20 & July 18 NCI ATRF (8560 Progress Drive, Frederick; June 27 & July 11 Building 560, Room 22-67A, Ft Detrick

Molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration
Description: While neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people, the molecular and cellular causes for these diseases are not well understood. Unraveling the effects of known disease-causing mutations is an ongoing area of research which has the potential to lead to novel therapeutic strategies to ameliorate progression or prevent pathogenesis. In this group, we will discuss the common features and unique aspects of several model diseases in order to strengthen our foundations as well as explore recent studies which have shed light on how certain mutations lead to specific, long-term cell death.

Co-leaders: Ryan Prestil, graduate student, NINDS; Stewart Humble, graduate student, NINDS; Michael Fernandopulle, graduate student, NINDS
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Wednesday, June 20, Tuesday, June 26, Tuesday, July 3, Tuesday, July 10, Tuesday, July 24; Time: 1-2pm; Building 35, Room 2G600 (Yellow Skybox)

Biology and the story of a million computers: A brief journey through the history of bioinformatics
Description: Over the past several decades, biology as a field has produced a vast amount of breakthroughs at an ever increasing pace. In almost each of the important milestones, discovery was guided by computer-driven models which leverage the data processing power of modern IT infrastructures. Today, the field of computational biology plays an indispensable role in virtually every aspect of biology and biotechnology. In this course, we will make a brief introduction to the field of computational biology (bioinformatics), and study the main concepts of genome assembly, metagenomics, and transcriptomics. While this will not be a hands-on practical course, the classes will aim at depicting the fundamental ideas behind these concepts by highlighting key publications which revolutionized the field.

Co-leaders: Sanjar Hudaiberdiev, postdoc, NLM; Jan Hoinka, postdoc, NLM;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Wednesday, June 20, Wednesday, June 27, Friday, July 13, Friday, July 20; Time: 5pm; Building 38A, Room 8th floor conf. room.

Cancer immunotherapy
Description: Your immune system fights off nasty invaders like viruses and bacteria to keep you healthy, but did you know that it also recognizes cancer? Harnessing immune cells to kill tumors is a promising and rapidly developing field. Come join us to learn about the various immune-modulating strategies, from checkpoint inhibitors to genetically engineered T cells, in the context of treating advanced cancerous disease. Members will review the clinical outcomes and learn the mechanism of action for each immune-based strategy. We will also review how to read a scientific paper and the phases of clinical testing, from the bench to the marketplace. We hope to see you there!

Co-leaders: Sarah Davies, graduate student, NHLBI; Elizabeth Potter, graduate student, NIAID;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 19, Tuesday, June 26, Tuesday, July 3, Tuesday, July 10, Tuesday, July 17; Time: 12-1pm; Building Building 10, CRC, Room 5-1608
Directions: Auditorium, past the metal elevators, past the first coffee shop, and continue going straight). You will find yourself in a large, windowed atrium with a Starbucks. At the base of the atrium, take the elevator to the 5th floor. Keep walking northward around the atrium, towards the North West wing. You'll see some desks/public work stations. The room is on the other side of that wall. You may also see a painting of people walking down an autumnal path near by. You made it!

The social network: Brain circuitry underlying social behaviors
Description: Acting appropriately in social situations, is not only important to prevent embarrassment, but in many cases critical for survival of individuals and for species propagation. In humans, deficits in social behavior are observed in many psychiatric conditions, from Autism to Alzheimers disease. However, understanding how a typical brain interprets and responds to various social scenarios is still not well defined. This journal club will cover recent publications investigating brain regions involved in aggression, parental care, pair-bonding, and social interactions. Sessions will introduce a variety of different species and scientific methodologies used in behavioral neuroscience. Members will gain an understanding of brain regions and neurochemicals important for regulating social behaviors.

Co-leaders: Sarah Williams Avram, staff scientist, NIMH; Adi Cymerblit-Sabba, research fellow, NIMH;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday June 28, Friday July 20, Friday July 27; Time: 1:00; Building 49, Room 5A46
Directions: Sign into Bldg 49 front desk using NIH badge (Contact person=Sarah Williams. 301-841-5540). Take the elevators to 5th floor, look for conference room behind the glass tiles.

From genetic screens to CRISPR: A survey of powerful methods to dissect biological function
Description: We will focus on various methods that are used in current biomedical research. Each journal club will begin with a quick introduction to a new method and a scientific paper utilizing that method will be discussed. Topics covered will potentially include: genetic screens, Mass Spectrometry, RNAi, RNAseq and CRISPR. Students will be expected to have taken a basic college level biology or an advanced high school level course.

Co-leaders: Saroj Regmi, postdoc, NICHD; Shane Chen, postdoc, NICHD; Hang Noh Lee, research fellow, NICHD
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; June 21, June 28, July 12, July 19, July 26; Time: 1-2PM; Building Building 49, Room 6th floor conference room
Directions: The Conference Room is right next to the elevator on the 6th floor of Building 49.

Developing novel strategies for the treatment of human cancer
Description: During the past decade, the advancements in technologies and scientific knowledge have enabled significant contribution to biomedical research. Based on these, several novel strategies have emerged in the treatment of various human diseases, including cancer. The overall goal is to overcome some of the limitations of the conventional treatments, and to improve clinical benefit to the patients. In this journal club, we intend to discuss some of the key published articles on genetic and immunological approaches that show promise of better treatment outcomes. Examples of such approaches include: targeted small molecule therapy, monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents, immunotoxins, CAR T cell-mediated therapy, checkpoint inhibitors and epigenetic regulations.

Co-leaders: Sivasubramanian Baskar, staff scientist, NHLBI; Robert West, staff scientist, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Friday, June 22, Friday, June 29, Friday, July 06, Friday, July 13, Friday, July 20, Friday, July 27; Time: 12:00 noon - 1:00 pm; Building 10/CRC, Room 4E-3121/5121
Directions: Take the Central elevator (near the grand piano and Cafe) from Bldg.10/CRC atrium to 3rd floor. Walk down the East Corridor, follow the sign To 3 East Labs, swing to the left to enter 3 East Labs. Walk down the hall, after the last door take the stairs on the right to 4th floor. Turn left to get to the conference rooms 4E-3121/5121.

Cancer immunotherapy: Bench to bedside
Description: Cancer immunotherapy was designated as the breakthrough of the year in 2013, and since then advances in immunotherapeutic approaches have led to unprecedented responses in patients with cancer. This journal club will cover recent publications (both reviews and data papers) on cutting edge immunotherapies intended to treat tumors: adoptive cell therapies with genetically modified immune cells including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells, antibodies and immune checkpoint blockade. Members of this journal club will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the immune system and its potential in fighting cancer, in addition to being able to critically read and dissect scientific literature.

Co-leaders: Stefan Barisic, postdoc, NHLBI; Emily Levy, graduate student, NHLBI;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Wednesday, June 20, Wendesday, June 27, Wednesday, July 11, Wednesday, July 18, Wednesday, July 25; Time: 4-5 pm; Building 10, Room FAES Classroom B1C211; except July 18: Room 4-3121 (East Labs, 4th floor)

Packing it up: How cells pack tangled DNA into neat chromosomes
Description: This journal club will discuss how cells deal with a packing challenge presented by the length of a genomic DNA that exceeds 10000-100000 times the cell's width. Furthermore, we will learn how cells arrange genomic DNA in a three-dimensional space for genetic transmission and to express genes involved in physiology and development.

Co-leaders: Subhash Verma, postdoc, NCI; Sabina Gudmundsson, graduate student, NCI; Manoj Rajaure, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, June 28, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: 4.30 PM; Building 37, Room 5.1 vestibule
Directions: The room is located just next to the 5th floor elevators.

Traffic jams in neurons: Current trends in mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases
Description: Neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, affect millions of people worldwide. Neurodegenerative diseases occur when nerve cells in the brain or peripheral nervous system progressively lose structure or function, resulting in death of neurons. Axonal transport is an essential process to maintain proper neuronal function because of the specialized neuronal polarity. Axonal transport on a microtubule highway delivers newly synthesized protein, lipids, mRNA, vesicles and organelles to the distal synapse and recycles misfolded proteins and aging organelles for clearance. Impairment of axonal transport causing traffic jams in neurons has recently emerged as a common factor in several neurodegenerative disorders. In this journal club, we will focus on the current state of knowledge about axonal transport deficits that contribute to pathogenesis of multiple neurodegenerative disease. Related papers will be discussed in the journal club with the aim for the student to get familiar with the research process, including frontier research approaches, data interpretation and how to critically evaluate scientific publications.

Co-leaders: Sunan Li, postdoc, NINDS; Xiu-Tang Cheng, research fellow, NINDS;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, June 21, Thursday, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: 12PM-1PM; Building 35, Room 3G600
Directions: Enter building 35, take elevator to 3rd floor. Look for blue skybox meeting room facing the atrium.

FREDERICK : Genetics of New Drug Development
Description: We will discuss current trends in the role of genetics and clinical pharmacology in new drug development. We will cover the beginning of bioinformatics. 1. Margaret Dayhoff : Atlas of protein sequences (algorism of PAM and BLOSUM). They are still using the default of BLAST
http://blog.openhelix.eu/?p=1078 2. We will cover the concept of population genetics and APOL1 discovery. 3. Next, we will do the practical examples to investigate the difference of MAF in pharmacogenetics. We will review the discovery of new drug based on genetic approach. 4. Align with the journal club, our team member will strive to pursue the submission of manuscript using the example of population genetics.

Co-leaders: Sungkweon Cho, postdoc, NCI; Brean Derrett, graduate student, NCI;
Dates/Times/Location: Frederick, MD; Wednesday, June 20; Thursday, July 5; Wednesday, July 18; Wednesday, August 1; Wednesday, August 15 (optional); Time: 3:30 PM; NCI FREDERICK (ATRF), Room E3800 OR TBD

Aging and Cancer Biology
Description: Aging is an inevitable time-dependent decline in physiological organ function and is a major risk factor for one of the most significant causes of human morbidity and mortality, "Cancer". The normal aging process affects many important biological processes within our bodies that result in the deterioration of proteins and DNA in the cells. Many of these damaged cells enter the state of growth arrest of the cells called" Senescence", but these cells remain metabolically active. Senescence is an efficient protective mechanism against cancer, forcing would-be cancer cells to stop dividing. But the senescence mechanism sometimes fails, and accumulating cancer-causing mutations produce the uncontrollable cell growth, and provides supportive microenvironment, and causes the formation and spread of cancer. In this summer journal club, we will focus on the molecular mechanism of cellular senescence, senescence-associated secretory phenotype, tumor microenvironments and cancer stem cells. Our journal club provides active student interactions, learning how to address the scientific problems, critical thinking, reviewing scientific manuscripts and learning about modern scientific techniques using in cell and molecular biology of cancer and aging.

Co-leaders: Suresh Kumar, staff scientist, NIA; Kerri Lal, graduate student, USHS; Veenu Tripathi, staff scientist, NIA
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thurdssay, July 5, Thursday, July 12, Thursday, July 19, Thursday, July 26; Time: 11am -12noon; Building 37, Room 2nd floor conference room 2041/2107

Diseases, cancer, and aging of the skin: Exploring the role of immunity in skin processes
Description: The skin is the largest human organ consisted of multiple skin layers and associated glands. It serves as the primary gatekeeper between the host and its environment. In addition to providing a physical barrier, the skin also contains a complex network of innate and adoptive immune cells promptly to respond to microbial invasions and environmental insults. Furthermore, the skin is colonized by trillions of microorganisms. These skin commensals contribute to the maintenance of skin homeostasis and immunity. Dysregulation in the structure and/or function of any of these components in the skin renders the host susceptible to infections, diseases, cancers, and aging of the skin. This Journal Club aims to explore the role of immunity in these skin processes. Background in immunology is needed to appreciate this Journal Club. During the last week of this JC, we will discuss various scientifically proven, cosmetic routines aimed to enhance skin appearance and to delay the skin aging process.

Co-leaders: Thuan Nguyen, graduate student, NIAID; Patricia Sikorski, graduate student, NIAID;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Thursday, 6/21, Thursday, 6/28, Thursday, 7/12, Thursday, 7/19, Thursday, 7/26; Time: 3 pm; Building 50, Room 6223

Advanced imaging techniques in biomedical sciences
Description: Microscopy is a key tool in biomedical research. Scientists from cancer biology and genetics to immunology, neuroscience and structural biology use imaging techniques to progress with their research. Besides compound microscopes, advanced instruments like superresolution microscopes (STED, PALM/STORM) and light-sheet microscopes are used more and more frequently in the biomedical laboratories. Journal club members will get an introduction to various microscopy techniques used on the NIH campus and a comprehensive overview about the current state-of-the-art of instrument development for biomedical research by discussing recent publications. Furthermore, they will learn how to critically evaluate scientific publications.

Co-leaders: Ulrike Boehm, postdoc, NCI; Harshad Vishwasrao, staff scientist, NIBIB;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Monday, June 18, Monday, June 25, Monday, July 2, Monday, July 9, Monday, July 16; Time: 12 pm; Building 41, Room B604A

The complex dance of chromosomes: How do cells condense their chromatin one hundred times to complete cell division?
Description: Each of us has enough DNA to reach from here to the sun and back, more than 300 times! DNA must be highly compacted to fit into the nucleus of the cell. To complete cell division, DNA must be further compacted over 100x. This can be thought of as akin to taking a rope as long as a football field and compacting it down to less than half an inch.

How is all of that DNA packaged so tightly into chromosomes and squeezed into a tiny nucleus? How, and why we need to achieve this incredible level of DNA compaction? How does it help to orchestrate the chromatin into the chromosomes and came out with two identical copies of cells?
In this 5-week journal club, we will walk you through how chromosome condense before mitosis and introduce the machinery which segregates these condensed chromosomes. Both a historical perspective and pieces of cutting-edge knowledge will be highlighted during the journal club session. This will allow students to understand where the field is coming from and the new tools available for mitosis studies.
The journal club format: This journal club will be 5 weeks long. The first meeting will be an introduction to the field, given by the instructors. In the next three weeks, students will take turns to present the papers (3-4 students per week will work together to present). The fifth meeting will be a roundtable discussion of the journal club context.

Co-leaders: Vasilisa Aksenova, postdoc, NICHD; Karen Plevock Haase, postdoc, NICHD;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Friday, June 22, Friday, June 29, Friday, July 13, Friday, July 20, Friday, July 27; Time: 3 pm; Building Building 49, Room The conference room on the 5th floor

A brief introduction to dopamine signaling in addiction and social behavior
Description: This journal club will cover some classic literature on dopamine function in reward and addiction, as well as introduce some recent literature on dopamine's role in social behavior. The papers we selected involve animal and human studies that include a number of cutting-edge neuroscience techniques- electrophysiology, voltammetry, fiber photometry, PET and optogenetics. We are excited to share our love of the dopamine system and its dynamic role in behavior!

Co-leaders: Wambura Fobbs, postdoc, NIDDK; Sebastiano Bariselli, postdoc, NIDDK;
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, MD; Tuesday, June 19, June 26, July 3, July 10, July 17, July 24; Time: 10 -11 am; Building Building 10, Room Conference Room 5-S233
Description: Enter building 10 from the South Entrance, turn right into a long corridor, turn left into the room at the entrance of the auditorium, and turn right. At this point you should see a bay with 4 elevators. Go up to 5th floor. Upon exiting the elevator, turn away from the long hallway towards the two doors. The classroom door is the one to the left.

 

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