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2017 Summer Journal Clubs

Click on a journal club title to read the description. Register for a Summer Journal Club  

Breakthrough Technologies in Biomedical Imaging
Lysosomes and Diseases
A perilous balance: Cancer and RNA regulation
Proteomics: The Final Frontier - Methods for the analysis of protein structure and function
Radars and missiles of the immune systems - discoveries leading to Nobel Prizes
From light to sight: biology of vision and blindness
Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Stem Cell Therapy
Public Health and Precision Medicine: Biomarkers, Risk Perception and Health Behavior
Genetics of birth & aging
FREDERICK-ATRF: Protein Photography 101: What a cell-fie can tell us about protein function
Lead the way! Cell migration from development to death
The DNA Damage Response and Human Disease
Evolution beyond the textbook: making sense of biology, solving crimes, and more!
Cryo-electron microscopy: A "cool" technique to see macromolecules in atomic details
3D Genomes and Nuclear Organization
Cancer Radiotherapy
Functional Anatomy and Behavior
ROCKVILLE: Malaria and Other Intracellular Pathogens
FREDERICK: Enjoy your life by maintaining proteostasis: Control of protein quality and quantity in health and disease
Gene Editing Techniques
RNA revisited: an exploration of the non-coding RNAs multiverse
Genome editing in high impact problems
The Immunotherapy of Cancer: Immune Checkpoint Blockade, Adoptive Cell Transfer, and CAR T-cells
Computational Psychiatry: Where math, brains, and behavior meet to improve mental health diagnosis and treatment
Cell Stress in Disease
Cell-based cancer therapies: helping the body to win the battle
Cancer Biology, Genetics & Bioinformatics
The RNA-Seq World
Neurogenetics
Cellular Senescence. When bad things happen to good cells
Linking cell fate: T cell migration and activation
Innate immunity, Inflammation, and Infection
Optical Microscopy & Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences

Journal Club Descriptions

Breakthrough Technologies in Biomedical Imaging
Description: In this journal club, we will discuss current imaging technologies that have impacted diagnostic and visualization capabilities of biomedical research. Related papers will be discussed in the journal club with the aim for student to analyze the different sections and get familiar with the research process. Moreover, we will focus on how to interpret the data independently without being biased by the conclusions presented in the article.

Co-leaders: Siddharth Khare, postdoc, NICHD; Afrouz Anderson, postdoc, NICHD
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Wednesday, June 21, 28, July 12, 19, 26; 3:00-4:00 pm; Bldg 49, Rm 5A46
Directions: 49 Convent Drive, Building 49, Room 5A46. Come to building 49 (you need to sign in at the front desk). Take the elevator at the lobby to the 5th floor and the conference room will be behind the glass wall.

Lysosomes and Diseases 
Description: The lysosome is a membrane-bound compartment found in animal cells. It contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes capable of breaking down many different types of biological polymers such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids etc., analogous to the activity of stomach. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are caused by dysfunction of lysosomal enzymes that lead to accumulation of undegraded biomolecules in lysosomes resulting enlargement of cells. At least 50 LSDs has been reported and roughly 1 LSD patient identified in 7,700 births. This journal club will cover recent publications on diseases associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Members will learn about methods and protocols for lysosomes examination and diagnosis of LSDs as well as how to critically evaluate scientific publications.

Co-leaders: Anowarul Amin, research fellow, NINDS; Pushpanathan Muthuirulan, postdoc, NICHD
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27; 3:00-4:00 pm; Building 10 (Hatfield), Room 5-2341 HS  on June 22; Building 10 (Hatfield), Room 5-2550 HS on June 29, July 13, and July 27; Building 10 (Hatfield), Room 5-1608 HS on July 6 and July 20

A perilous balance: Cancer and RNA regulation
Description: What happens when cellular metabolism goes haywire? Often, cancer is the outcome. In this journal club, we will study the cellular physiology of transformed cells. We will start by examining genes involved in creating immortal cells and how to evaluate this phenotype in a lab. Then, we will consider downstream effects of dysregulation, focusing on the emerging role of cellular RNA control in disease. We expect that the theme of cancer therapeutics will be ever-present, even though it is not a primary focus of this journal club. We expect that our discussions will lead to more questions than answers, and we are excited to enjoy the process of investigation with you.

Co-Leaders: Aparna Kishor, research fellow, NHLBI; Christina Ross, research fellow, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Friday, July 7, 14, 21, 28; 4:00 pm; Building 50, Room 2328
Directions: Enter from main entrance. Go up one floor to the 2nd floor. Face the restrooms and then turn right down the hallway. The door to the room will be on your right.

Proteomics: The Final Frontier - Methods for the analysis of protein structure and function
Description: The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray analysis have given scientists a wide view of the changing genome and transcriptome, propelling personalized medicine and systems biology into a new age. The final frontier, however, lies in the changing proteome - a vast, complicated network of protein effectors which respond to the world outside of the cell and coordinate cellular processes. Study of the highly dynamic and complex proteome demands sophisticated techniques, such as mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, x-ray crystallography and confocal microscopy. In this journal club, we will introduce these methods within the context of their application to the study of Toll-like Receptor signaling, a critical component of the immune response highlighted by the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Co-Leaders: Casey Daniels, postdoc, NIAID; Joseph Gillen, postdoc, NIAID
Dates/ Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27; 12:00 pm; Building 4, Room 118
Directions: The meeting room is on the first floor near the front entrance to building 4.

Radars and missiles of the immune systems - discoveries leading to Nobel Prizes
Description: This journal club is designed to introduce students to the remarkable world of immunology. We will discuss how the innate immune system senses infection through pattern recognition receptors, and how pathogens are fought by the immune system. We will start with an introduction of the conserved and diversified immune systems of different species across evolution, and how these studies lead to the discovery of evolutionary conserved pathogen recognition receptors (toll-like receptors); recipient of the 2012 Noble Prize. We will further discuss the new advances in this field through the discovery of intracellular pathogen sensing pathways: the non canonical inflammasome. After that we will discuss various mechanisms of pathogen clearance ranging from physical capture to chemical inactivation.

Schedule:
06-22-17 --- Evolution of host defense: conservation and variation in different kingdom
06-29-17 --- The dirty little secret in innate immune recognition - how the discovery of Toll-like receptors lead to a Nobel Prize
07-06-17 --- Intracellular Recognition of Pathogens by inflammasomes: Explosive Impact
07-13-17 --- Capture and Evisceration: Physical Disembodiment of Pathogens
07-20-17 --- Chemical Warfare: Radical Poisons
Co-Leaders: Clinton Bradfield, postdoc, NIAID; Bin Lin, postdoc, NIAID
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20; 1:30 pm; Building 4, Room 414

From light to sight: biology of vision and blindness
Description: We will discuss topics relating to how the retina interprets light signals from the environment and in turn sends electrical signals to the brain. In addition, we will explore a couple of blinding conditions and their pathologies

Co-Leaders: Dustin Whitaker, graduate student, NEI; Andrew Smith, graduate student, NEI; Passley Hargrove, graduate student, NEI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursdays, June 22, July 6, 13, 20, 27; 4:00-5:00 pm; Building 10, Room 10N202 (Cogan conference room)
Directions: Take elevators between Masur conference room and FAES bookstore up to the 10th floor. Walk down N corridor. Cogan conference room is at the end of the first hallway on the left (before reaching the next set of elevators).

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Stem Cell Therapy
Description: This journal club will focus on animal models developed to study IBD, as well as the current status of stem cell therapy in this field. It will highlight the practicality of the models and what to expect when working with them, including administration of stem cells.

Co-Leaders: Natalia Schneider Nunes, graduate student, CC; Erik Karmele, graduate student, NIAID
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Tuesday, June 20, 27, July 11, 18, 25; 3:00-4:00 pm; Building 4, Room 414

Public Health and Precision Medicine: Biomarkers, Risk Perception and Health Behavior
Description: Through critically analyzing current journal articles, students will learn about the promise of precision medicine for public health. They will explore the applications of molecular biomarkers in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. They will further learn about how individuals perceive and use personalized health information. Students will develop an understanding of a variety of methods including those commonly used in molecular epidemiology, biomarker development and social and behavioral research.
This journal club would be suitable for students considering a career or with an interest in public health, medicine, genetics or cancer.

Co-Leaders: Erin Turbitt, postdoc, NHGRI; Claire Meaney, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Wednesday, June 21, 28, July 26 2:00-3:00 pm in Building 31, Room b1e14; July 19 3:00-4:00 pm in Building 31, Room b1e14
Directions: Enter building 31A and turn right. Take the elevators to B1. Turn right and follow the corridor to the left (towards the sign "NIH Supply Shop". Continue to follow the hallway and the door to the B1 E12&14 conference room is the 3rd and 4th door on the right.

Genetics of birth & aging
Description: We will look at how genes control aspects of embryonic development and aging, with a special focus on neurobiology and human disease. We will consider the fruit fly model organism as a tool for understanding the genetics of neural stem cell selection, neurodegenerative disorders, and normal aging.

Co-Leaders: Ginger Hunter, postdoc, NINDS; Arvind Shukla, postdoc, NINDS
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Tuesday, June 20, 27, July 11, 18; 1:00 pm; Building 35, Room 3G600
Directions: enter building 35, take elevator/stairs to 3rd floor. Look for blue meeting room facing the atrium.

FREDERICK-ATRF: Protein Photography 101: What a cell-fie can tell us about protein function
Description: This journal club will focus on protein-protein interactions at the structural level, with emphasis on what these interactions tell us about protein function.

Co-Leaders: Olumide Kayode, postdoc, NCI; Gwen Buel, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Frederick; Wednesday, June 21, July 12, 19, 26; 11:00 am; ATRF Room E-1203

Lead the way! Cell migration from development to death
Description: Cell migration is required at every phase of an animal's life, from the migration of neurons during the early development of the brain, to wound healing in adults. In this journal club, we will highlight some recent papers characterizing the critical role cell migration plays in early development, maintenance of a mature adult organism, and finally its role in disease states such as cancer metastasis. All meetings will be the same time/day/place and brain food will be provided!

Co-Leaders: Hetal Shah, graduate student, NINDS; Michelle Baird, graduate student, NHLBI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Wednesday, June 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26; 11:00 am; Building 35
Directions: Blue Skybox - 3rd floor
This is the hanging skybox seen from the lobby of the building.

The DNA Damage Response and Human Disease
Description: Damage to the DNA can compromise genomic stability and result in human disease. The DNA damage response pathways have evolved to protect against insults to the DNA and help maintain genomic integrity.
In this journal club, we will focus on DNA repair mechanisms and their role in human diseases.
Our members will learn and practice how to approach a scientific question and critically read scientific papers while learning several molecular and cellular biology techniques.

Co-Leaders: Inbal Gazy, postdoc, NIDDK; Xiaonan Zhao, research fellow, NIDDK
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20; 1:30-2:30 pm; Building 8, Room 122

Evolution beyond the textbook: making sense of biology, solving crimes, and more!
Description: Join us for a journey through the fascinating and sometimes unconventional paths of evolution. Did you know that evolutionary trees can help solving crimes? Or that evolution rules cancer progression? Along the way we will discuss key concepts of evolutionary theory, such as selection pressure and fitness landscape, that shed light on a broad range of biological phenomena.

Co-Leaders: Jaime Iranzo, postdoc, NLM; Guilhem Faure, postdoc, NLM; Frida Belinky, postdoc, NLM
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 29, July 13, 20, 27; 11:00 am; Building 38A, 8th floor conference room

Cryo-electron microscopy: A "cool" technique to see macromolecules in atomic details
Description: Knowing the structure of macromolecules such as protein, DNA and lipid membranes gives us a better understanding of their biological function and insight into the physiology of the cell.
Recently, the use of electron microscopes has seen a rapid development thanks to new instruments and software. As a result, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has emerged as a method of choice in structural biology as it can overcome several obstacles found in other techniques.
The aim of this journal club is to provide a basic understanding of the cryo-EM technique. Through reading and commenting the newest publications, we will try to tackle some open questions in cryo-EM: What is the current resolution limit for biomolecules? What is the smallest macromolecule size that can be resolved? How can we obtain the structure of large, transient complexes? How can we visualize membrane proteins? Can we visualize molecules even though their structure is flexible and variable?

Co-Leaders: Jana Ognjenovic, postdoc, NCI; Jean-Philippe Demers, postdoc, NCI; Sagar Chittori, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27 from 1:00-2:00 pm in Building 50, Room 4307
Directions: Building 50, Room 4307: 4th floor, conference room in 4303-4318

3D Genomes and Nuclear Organization
Description: We will focus on principles and mechanisms of the three-dimensional organization of chromatin in eukaryotic nuclei. Ranging from chromosome territories to enhancer-promoter looping, the techniques and principles used to understand the 3D genome are at the cutting edge of modern biology and have major implications for human heath, disease treatment, and biological information transfer.

Co-Leaders: Justin Demmerle, graduate student, NICHD; Berkley Gryder, postdoc, NCI; Carson Miller, postdoc, NICHD
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19, 26, July 3, 10, 17, 24; 4:00 pm; Building 6B, Room 429
Directions: Come into Building 6B via the basement entrance facing Buildings 31 and 33 (corner of campus near Cedar Lane and Rockville Pike). Take either elevator to the 4th floor, and the conference room is to your left at the T-intersection of hallways.

Cancer Radiotherapy
Description: A radiotherapy (RT) is a form of cancer therapy where the ionizing radiation is utilized to kill the tumor mass. It is a very commonly used in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs and is a rapidly emerging field of cancer therapy. In the recent years, there has been radical development to improve the therapeutic efficacy and minimize the adverse effects of conventional RT. Here in this journal club, we intend to focus on both basic science and translational research articles related to radiotherapy. These articles will give the students a perspective of the pathway that radiotherapy agents must go throw before getting translated into the clinic. At the end of the journal club, the students will also be able to answers various questions associated with radiotherapy such as different types and mode of action of radionuclides, safety precautions to be taken while handling radionuclides, pros, and cons of radiotherapy, etc.

Co-Leaders: Jyoti Roy, postdoc, NCI; Sunita Chopra, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19, 26, July 3, 10; 4:00-5:00 pm; Building 10, B2.5 conference room

Functional Anatomy and Behavior
Description: Elucidating the circuits underlying specific behaviors observed in common neuropsychiatric disorders is critical for understanding them and to develop new therapeutic strategies.
Recent year have seen the rise of powerful techniques that allow researchers to decipher the neural correlates of complex cognitive tasks, such as attention, learning and decision-making.
This journal club will present different behavioral tasks and methods; specifically, tasks involving operant chambers coupled with optogenetics, chemogenetic and pharmacological approaches. Through literature reviews, the interns will get familiar with the functional anatomy of behavior.

Co-Leaders: Gabriela Zabala-Aleman, graduate student, NIMH; Fany Messanvi, postdoc, NIMH
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Wednesday, June 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26; 12:00-1:00 pm, Building 35A, Room 2E-452 on Pod E

ROCKVILLE: Malaria and Other Intracellular Pathogens
Description: Malaria and other intracellular pathogens are considered neglected diseases with few resources allocated for research. This is a multidiscipline journal club that will critically evaluate recent publications covering pathogen/vector biology, drug resistance, and host/pathogen immunology.

Co-Leaders: Kristin Lane, postdoc, NIAID; Gunjan Arora, postdoc, NIAID
Dates/Times/Location: Rockville (Twinbrook); Wednesday, June 21 at 4:00 pm in Building TB3, 2nd floor conference room; July 12, 19, at 4:00 pm in Twinbrook 2 conference room; July 26 at 4:00 pm in Twinbrook 3

FREDERICK: Enjoy your life by maintaining proteostasis: Control of protein quality and quantity in health and disease
Description: Proteostasis, or protein homeostasis, is essential to maintain cellular function, and the disturbance of proteostasis is associated with many diseases in the list of leading causes of death, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. This journal club will focus on the current biomedical approach in controlling protein quality and quantity in human diseases and also discuss complex human conditions where protein homeostasis is disrupted. By completion of this journal club, attendees will have developed an understanding of common mechanisms of proteostasis in regulation of human diseases and learned the paper reading, presentation, and critical thinking.

Co-Leaders: Kuo-Hui Su, research fellow, NCI; Cem Sonmez, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Frederick; Wednesday, June 21, July 5, 12, 19; 1:00-2:00 pm; Building 560, Room 11-61

Gene Editing Techniques
Description: Gene editing techniques are quickly changing the manner in which biomedical research is being conducted. The advent of technologies such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas have given researchers tools to model and treat diseases that were previously unattainable. The goal of this journal club is to look at the literature pertaining to the use, modification, and enhancement of these technologies.

Co-Leaders: Laura Gorrell, graduate student, NICHD; Kristoffer Johansen Haurum, graduate student, NHGRI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27; 3:00-4:30 pm; Location June 22, 29, July 20, July 27: Building 10 (Hatfield Center) Room 3-2550; Location July 6 and 13: Building 10 (Hatfield Center), Room 5-2341

RNA revisited: an exploration of the non-coding RNAs multiverse
Description: While 90% of our genome is transcribed into RNA, only 2% of our cellular DNA results in a protein coding sequence. What do these other non-coding RNAs do within the cell? Why does the disruption of these non-coding RNAs result in so many human pathologies ranging from cancer to neurological and autoimmune diseases? Non-coding RNAs can function as a structural scaffold, adapter molecules or even carry out chemical reactions in a manner that is remarkably similar to protein enzymes. This journal club will focus on the function(s) of different non-coding RNAs from the large ribosome all the way down to ribozymes and microRNAs. We will explore the structure and functions of these non-coding RNAs and the methods used to study these molecules, with an emphasis on experimental design and critical data analysis. Students will present and discuss selected scientific articles and will have opportunity to choose articles relevant to their internship and scientific interests.

Co-Leaders: Ljiljana Sjekloca, research fellow, NHLBI; Crystal Fagan, postdoc, NHLBI; Jaira Vasconcellos, research fellow, NIDDK
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, June 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26; 4:00-5:30 pm; Building 50, 2nd Floor Library, Room 2328
Directions: https://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx

Genome editing in high impact problems
Description: Genome editing technologies have shaped the face of research. In this journal club, we will introduce the principles of genome editing and explore current applications of this exciting technology on high impact problems including HIV, malaria, and cancer. Takeaways include familiarity with current genome editing strategies, experimental design, and acclimatization to reading scientific literature.

Co-Leaders: Markus Brown, graduate student, NCI; Georg Emons, research fellow, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Friday, June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21; 4:00-5:00 pm; Building 50, Room 1328/1334
Directions: Building 50 is located on South Drive, adjacent to Building 12 and across the street from buildings 5 and 8. When entering NIH from the metro station, walk along the left side of the street until you cross Center Dr (the large anchor in the center of the intersection will be on your right). Building 50 will be directly ahead. Enter the lobby and continue past the elevators, turning right into the narrow hallway. Room number 1328 is the first door on the right.
All journal club meetings will be held in the same building, in the same room, at the same time.

The Immunotherapy of Cancer: Immune Checkpoint Blockade, Adoptive Cell Transfer, and CAR T-cells
Description: Cancer immunotherapy was designated as the breakthrough of the year in 2013, and advances in immunotherapeutic approaches have led to unprecedented responses in patients with refractory cancers. This journal club will cover recent publications (both reviews and data papers) on cutting edge immunotherapies intended to treat hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Topics we will cover include immune checkpoint blockade (including but not limited to targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis), adoptive cell therapies with T-cells and NK cells, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells. Members of this journal club will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the immune system and learn about different immunotherapeutic techniques, in addition to being able to critically read and dissect scientific literature.

Co-Leaders: Meg Goswami, graduate student, NHLBI; Emily Levy, graduate student, NHLBI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19, 26, July 10, 24 from 2:00-3:00 pm in Building 10, FAES classroom 8; July 17 from 2:00-3:00 pm in Building 10, Room 2-3330.

Computational Psychiatry: Where math, brains, and behavior meet to improve mental health diagnosis and treatment 
Description: Computational Psychiatry is a new interdisciplinary field that uses mathematical methods and combines it with what we know about the brain, biology, and psychology, to define and track typical and atypical human behavior. The primary goal of this field is to find better ways to understand, detect, diagnose and treat a number of psychiatric conditions. With promising early findings in animal and human research, the purpose of this journal club will be to provide a broad introduction to this exciting new area across multiple levels of analysis. We will discuss recent publications that span the use of this framework for research in basic neuroscience, psychiatric diagnosis, as well as in the development of targeted treatments and assessments. Attendees will gain exposure to the methods used to study mental health across these levels, and will learn to critically evaluate literature between different, but related subfields.

Co-Leaders: Merage Ghane, graduate student, NIMH; Craig Taswell, graduate student, NIMH; Wan-Ling Tseng, postdoc, NIMH
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19 from 10:00-11:30 am in Building 10, FAES Rooms 6 & 7, Wednesday, June 28 from 3:30-5:00 pm in Building 10, FAES Room 6 (B1C208), Monday, July 3 from 10:00-11:30 am in Building 10, FAES Rooms 6 & 7 or Wednesday, July 5 from 10:00-11:30 am in Building 10, FAES Room 4 (B1C205), Monday, July 10 from 10:00-11:30 am in Building 10, FAES Room 7 (B1C206), Tuesday, July 18 from 10:00-11:30 am in Building 10, FAES Room 2 (B1C209)

Cell Stress in Disease
Description: This journal club will focus on the mechanisms of cellular stress (proteostasis) and its implications in disease. Specifically, we will evaluate therapeutic strategies designed to interfere with proteostatic mechanisms in cancer progression.

Co-Leaders: Michael Moses, postdoc, NCI; Abbey Zuehlke, postdoc, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Tuesday, June 27, July 11, 18, 25; 1:00 pm; Building 10, Room 2W-5961
Directions: From the clinical center atrium, head south towards elevators/admissions/travel office. Turn right after the fishtanks (travel office will be on your left and admissions on your right) towards admissions/ 1 WEST laboratories. Walk straight (passing the playroom on your right) and enter the 1st floor West lab hallway. Head straight to the end, turning right at the end of the hall (passing the break room on your left), and taking another right. Head up the stairs on your right to the 2nd floor. Room 2-5961 will be around the corner.

Cell-based cancer therapies: helping the body to win the battle
Description: In this Journal Club, we are going to review the strategies that the body uses to fight cancer cells and how those can be "boosted". We will start with Natural Killer (NK) cells, the cell type in charge of killing cancer cells. But what happens if the tumor manages to evade NK cell surveillance? What can we provide to help NK cells to kill the tumor? To answer these questions, we will discuss antibody-based therapies and also introduce a new approach: Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy. In this therapy, cells from the patient are modified with an engineered T cell receptor specifically directed against the tumor. In these Journal Club sessions we will go together through scientific articles, experiments and techniques, encouraging participation and scientific discussion.

Co-Leaders: Olga Anton Hurtado, research fellow, NCI; Javier Traba Dominguez, research fellow, NHLBI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, June 23, 30, July 21, 28; 4:30 pm; Building 10, Room 6-3121
Directions: The room is located in the new part of building 10 (CRC). From the Atrium, go to the 5th floor. Head to the East side laboratories and take the far steps or elevator to the 6th floor.

Cancer Biology, Genetics & Bioinformatics
Description: Our journal club will focus on broad topics with a focus in the following: using genetic and bioinformatic approaches to study cancer biology.

Co-Leaders: Patty Wiley, postdoc, NCI; Snehal Gaikwad, postdoc, NCI; Sayeh Gorjifard, graduate student, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Tuesday, June 20, 27, July 11, 18, 25; 1:00 pm; Building 37, Room 3142
Directions: Building 37, 3rd floor

The RNA-Seq World
Description: RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a deep sequencing technology that allows a researcher to map and quantify the entire RNA state within a cell, tissue, or organism. At only 10 years old, RNA-Seq has transformed our understanding of cellular gene expression by providing an unprecedented global view of the transcriptome, its organization, and its regulation. RNA-Seq has uncovered novel features of how genes are organized within the genome, alternative splicing events, new RNA species and modifications, and changes in gene expression that were previously undetectable with available technology. RNA-Seq is now being applied to more diverse and complex biological states (e.g. cancer, the human microbiome, immunity) to further understand features and functions of cellular gene expression that have potential utility in aiding disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. In this journal club, we will discuss the fundamentals of RNA-Seq, its use to uncover novel principles of gene expression, and its future applications in medicine.

Co-Leaders: Quira Zeidan, postdoc, NICHD; Sarah Fritz, postdoc, NHLBI; Laura Marler, graduate student, NICHD
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19, 26, July 3, 10, 17, 24; 12:00-2:00 pm; Building 6, Room 220
Directions: When entering Building 6 through the front doors, go up one floor. Turn to the right when exiting the stairs, and the conference room, Room 220, will be directly in front of you.

Neurogenetics  

Description: While neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people, the molecular and cellular causes for these diseases are not well understood. Unraveling the effects of known disease-causing mutations is an ongoing area of research which has the potential to lead to novel therapeutic strategies to ameliorate progression or prevent pathogenesis. In this group, we will discuss the common features and unique aspects of several model diseases in order to strengthen our foundations as well as explore recent studies which have shed light on how certain mutations lead to specific, long-term cell death.

Co-Leaders: Ryan Prestil, graduate student, NINDS; Michael Fernandopulle, graduate student, NINDS; Stewart Humble, graduate student, NINDS
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Tuesdays, June 27, Wednesday, July 5, Tuesday, July 11, 18, 25; 1:00 pm; Building 35, Room 2G-600
Directions: 2nd floor skybox (yellow)

Cellular Senescence. When bad things happen to good cells
Description: What is cellular Senescence? How we detect cellular Senescence in culture dish and in human body? What influence does this have on normal cells (good cells) and tumor cells (bad cells). What factors can induce cellular senescence and its implication on human ageing and cancer. This journal club will give you the opportunity to learn about the biology of senescent cells and what good and bad influences do they have on our normal physiology. Are there agents that can kill or clear senescence cells? You will explore answers to all these intuitive questions in this journal club. The club will expose you with scientific papers with classical experiments to detect cellular senescence. You will familiarize yourself with the characteristics, physiology and pathological consequences of senescent cells. You will be able to summarize scientific information to your peers, and have guided discussions in the class. Please join us in unraveling the secrets to this cellular fate.

Co-Leaders: Sarwat Naz, postdoc, NCI; Anthony G Kirilusha, postdoc, NHGRI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda, Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20; 4:00-5:00 pm; Building 10, Floor B2.5, Room B3MB38
Directions: Enter through South side of Building 10, right side of B2 cafeteria there is an entrance to the Molecular Imaging Clinic. Enter there and take an elevator down to level B3. Come out and then take stairs on the right hand side to go to level B2.5. The conference room is located at the end of the corridor.

Linking cell fate: T cell migration and activation
Description: Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development. Thus, the induction of long-lasting CD8+memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. This journal club aims to highlight how T cells differentiation requires a balance between T migration and activate. We will discuss seminal papers in the field that highlight the role of migration during activation and differentiation and challenge traditional dogma. Students will learn how to identify, read, critically evaluate, discuss, and present thought-provoking and stimulating papers.

Co-Leaders: Tara Capece, postdoc, NIAID; Thorsten Prustel, staff scientist, NIAID
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Wednesday, June 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26; 3:00 pm; Building 4, Room 414

Innate immunity, Inflammation, and Infection
Description: One can argue that our biological purpose in life is to reproduce and pass on our genes. Before we can fulfill this biological duty, however, we must reach adulthood. In order to reach adulthood, we must win the war waged by millions of microbes surrounding us. Luckily, our body has a dedicated network called the immune system to combat these microbial invasions. The innate immune response is a part of the immune system, and inflammation is triggered whenever there is an infection. This Journal Club aims to explore the role of the innate immune response and inflammation in the context of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections. Each week, a different type of infection will be discussed.

Co-Leaders: Thuan Nguyen, graduate student, NIAID; Francois de Mets, graduate student, NCI
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Thursday, June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27; 2:00 pm; Building 50, 6th floor conference room

Optical Microscopy & Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences
Description: Microscopy is a key tool in modern biology. Almost every institute and therefore every scientific focus area at the NIH - from cancer biology and genetics to immunology, neuroscience and structural biology - works with microscopes. Besides widefield / confocal microscopes, newer instruments like superresolution microscopes (STED, PALM/STORM) and light-sheet microscopes are used more and more frequently to better understand biology. Journal club members will get an introduction to various microscopy techniques used on campus. Furthermore, they will learn how to critically evaluate scientific publications.

Co-Leaders: Ulrike Boehm, postdoc, NCI; Harshad Vishwasrao, staff scientist, NIBIB
Dates/Times/Location: Bethesda; Monday, June 19 and 26, Friday, June 30 and July 7; 12:00-1:00 pm; Building 41, Room B604A

Register for a Summer Journal Club!